Dream a Little Dream

Slowly they enter, in pairs, by fours, sometimes one, then a group to big to count, young and old. They find their seats; the anticipation palpable, if the low hum of constant voices is anything to go by. Scattered around the theater, I can spot some children in costume – a Belle here, a Gaston there. The scent of popcorn fills the air and soon all the seats are filled. The pre-movie scenes are showing on the screen and the lights dim slightly accompanied by a noticeable decrease in the sounds of talking. Then suddenly, the screen goes dark for a moment, and a voice comes over the loudspeaker.32164704480_194c0e2348_b

“Ladies and Gentlemen, welcome to our theater. We hope you will enjoy tonight’s showing of ‘Beauty and the Beast’ in 3D. As you exit the theater, please drop your glasses in the boxes at the doors. Now before we begin our showing, we have a special surprise. As some of you may have heard, cast members have been traveling around the country making surprise drop in appearances at different theaters, and we are thrilled that Josh Gad and Dan Stevens are here tonight with us! Please give them a warm welcome!”

And the place goes nuts. (Who am I kidding, me too. Just a little.)  They come in and walk right toward us, and stop to shake our hands and say hello  (because we chose to sit in the row where everyone walks past between tiers) and my husband takes a picture of me standing between them before they continue on toward the front of the theater and…Hey, it’s my fantasy, I get to direct it any way I damn well please.

Seriously though, we really are going to see ‘Beauty and the Beast’ tomorrow night, and is it just a little silly I’m this excited? I mean, I never even saw the Disney original until last week for Pete’s sake. Yeah, I know, that’s pitiful, right? But since I don’t have kids, it sort of slipped off my radar and I just never watched it. Oh I knew the basic story and all, and most of the songs, but just never saw the whole movie. Now, however, with the new movie coming up, I decided I really needed to see it so I knew what the original was. Gawd, I’m such a softie too, sniffle, sniffle, I admit I shed a tear. I’ll probably bawl watching live action. And let’s face it, I’ll watch almost anything with Dan Stevens. (By the way, if you haven’t watched Legion on FX, you’re missing an insane, unreal, amazing, fantastic, incredible show.)  And what percent of us watched Emma Watson grow up as Hermione Granger? Come on, admit it, you’re dying to see her in a more grown up role, aren’t you. No Harry, Ron or Snape, just her.

So some of the cast members really have been doing drop in surprise visits this week at theaters around the country. Of course, with the thousands of theaters that the movie opened at this week, statistically speaking I’m smart enough and realistic enough to know it’s highly unlikely they’ll be coming to our theater. But you know, can you imagine if they did? Holy smokes, wouldn’t that be crazy! I’d say my life was pretty well complete, having seen Cary Elwes live before a showing of ‘The Princess Bride’ on the big screen, and then some of the cast members before seeing ‘Beauty and the Beast’. (Just remember, it’s easier to be happy when you set the bar lower.)

I’ll keep you posted on the outcome, and let you know if it really happens. After all, a girl can dream.

Saturday night, the update, as promised. It breaks my heart to tell you this ;), alas, no real life sightings of Gaston, Le Fou or the Beast, but the movie was wonderful. I thought it was a great experience to see it in 3D, and everything about it was well done. There are a number of laugh out loud events, the songs are well performed by the actors, and it’s visually rich. I can’t wait until it’s out on Blu-ray so we can have a copy at home.

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Spring’s a Coming

Wind chills of 30 below zero, snow drifts higher than the top of the car in the winter, followed by springs so short they barely exist and then summer with it’s heat, humidity and blood sucking mosquitos – yep, you need to be especially brave and hardy to live in Minnesota all your life. At least that’s what I keep telling myself. The reality is much less flattering, but there’s no need to go there just yet. Instead, today I’m feeling a little like a certain well-known storyteller that you may have listened to on public radio, who tells tales of his fictional hometown.

We’re starting to awaken from what feels like a strange winter in my hometown of Minneapolis. This year we’ve seen elements of the worst of what winter has to offer us, none of which lasted for more than a day or two, and all of which were spread out just enough to ensure very limited time outside because it was either too cold, too windy, too wet, too icy, too something to enjoy being outside in winter. Please don’t misunderstand, I much prefer sun, sand and 80 degrees, but realistically if we live here, we do have to peacefully co-exist with winter and spend some time outdoors in it, so we learn how to dress for the weather. Boots to -20 or so, heavily insulated parkas, down mittens, fleece hats and scarves, and we follow it up with a hot beverage or two. (Some of us might even have a hot adult beverage or two, but that’s a story for a different day.) That all assumes, however, that whatever layer you’ve donned is enough to protect you from the onslaught of the elements of the moment. Reallistically, there is nothing that protects you well when wind chills are in the dangerous range and then just when that stops, it starts to rain. As the day ends the temperature drops and the rain turns to ice and now everything has a lovely coating of thin ice for a few days. After that melts, the temperature drops again to well below zero. And around and around we went. All flippin winter.

But the other day it was different as Mother Nature messed with us in her own slightly twisted way. Winds shifted from North to South and became almost gently and balmy. The sun made an appearance and was high enough in the sky that it could produce warmth when it touched your skin, which we Minnesotans were brave enough to show since the ambient air temperature was in the 50s. The 50s!  Folks in California pull out parkas and Ugg boots at 61 degrees, or so I’m told, but here we put on T-shirts and shorts and even a few sandals, although since many of us don’t do maintenance pedicures over the winter, our toes don’t have cute polish on and heaven forbid we show our bare toes without adornment. But I digress.

My mornings are special for me, my husband is still asleep, my furry four-legged children haven’t started chattering for the day and the world hasn’t woken up and begun to annoy me. I drink coffee, read the news and try to not get depressed at the general state of things out there. But this one day, as I sat here I suddenly became aware of something different around me. A sound I hadn’t heard for so long that I nearly didn’t recorgnize it, and I had to consciously pause for a moment and think about it. It was the birds chirping outside! For the first time in months, the birds were back and doing their spring thing. Suddenly, all the crap in politics, health care reform, wiretapping, none of it mattered. Spring was on it’s way to Minnesota.

When that happens, there is a noticeable difference in attitudes among residents here. A new spring in our steps is felt, smiles appear on our faces, we start looking strangers in the eyes again and saying hello after a long winter of being bundled up and looking down at the ground. That’s not rudeness by the way, it’s just our way of reducing the number of passages for cold air to enter under our coats – chin down to block the neck opening in case you either didn’t wear a scarf, or in case your scarf doesn’t quite cut the mustard. But hearing the birds as they are singing their little hearts out? Ah, who cares about a little cool air, we can deal with that, spring is on the way! IMG_1404 - Version 3There are chickadees, goldfinches,  and robins, oh my! (OK, we have the chickadees and goldfinches all year long, but they don’t sing a whole lot in winter, and the goldfinches turn a kind of weird shade of chartreuse. When they start looking bright yellow again, that’s another harbinger of spring.)

Of course, just as we allowed our collective emotions to get excited and think winter might be over with, just that fast she turned on us and walloped us with a reminder that it ain’t over til it’s over and “here’s 4 more inches of snow and minus 3 degrees (Farenheit, for those of you in Celcius world) for a temperature” as a reminder to not got too big for our collective britches. Oh well, I hadn’t worn my new boots yet anyway.

Crossing the Great Divide

Look around next time you’re running errands, or when you next read the headlines,  pay extra close attention and you’ll probably be surprised to find an overabundance of labels. Oh I don’t mean sticky labels, or post it notes although it might be better if I did, as those could be removed. I’m talking about the kind that are written with the virtual sharpie, and create invisible divisions. Women’s issues…healthcare issues…education issues…human rights issues…gender equality issues…LGBTQ issues…pay gap issues…human trafficking issues…abuse issues. Each of these has the ability to conjure up a picture of someone in distress in our minds, producing a familiar clench in our collective bellies.

Throughout the election cycle and now into the governing cycle we’ve been inundated with stories that cross the partisan divide, educating our nation on how these great groups of electors will solve each of these problems. They’ll fight the war on hunger, on healthcare and health insurance, on education, on trade, on pay, on this, that and the other. It’s the same story told over and over and over again, and nothing really ever changes. The only thing that’s any different now than 50 or even 100 years ago, is that by virtue of the internet and social media, the megaphone has gotten larger and louder. But are the stories really any different? Or are we just more aware of them because they are now able to be placed in front of us constantly? Isn’t it time to ask ourselves, why nothing ever changes? Why is it that when the politicians get to Washington, they spend all their time playing political tug of war? Did we elect them to do that, or is there something else happening?

In theory we’ve elected these individuals that are, in theorysupposedly bright, yet they faithfully embody Enstein’s Theory of Insanity over and over again, year after year, election cycle after election cycle. (Well, not so much a theory, really. He said the definition of insanity was doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.) As a child, I learn very quickly if I put my hand on a hot stove, I get burned and I don’t do it again. So why do our politicians insist on fighting the identical fights year after year? Two possibilities exist. One, they aren’t bright enough to figure it out (in which case they should never have been re-elected) and two, they’re all crazy like a fox and know that if they actually solved the issues, they’d have no jobs to come back to. If we go with that first possibility, and we ARE re-electing them repeatedly, well then the problems really are our own damn faults, aren’t they, and we’re the ones living up to Einstein’s definition of insanity.  Which leaves the second option, they’re all crazy like a fox.

There is a central theme in a solution however, for all of the issues that the politicians  – whether they are local or national – are tasked to solve. Remove the labels – all of them. Not just from the issues themselves, but from the individuals trying to solve the problems too. No more making this about a man issue or a woman issue, or a Democrat or Republican. It’s not about you-me-us-them. It needs to start being about doing the right thing for people. Doing unto others as you would have them do unto you. Those last 4 words really are key. It needs to stop being about imposing our beliefs on others, but stopping and thinking about what that really means. How will you feel when someone else forces you to have THEIR beliefs imposed on you against your will? Just because they could? When you begin to think about things with that mindset, suddenly some of the decisions take on new meaning. What might reactions be if someone’s children can’t attend a charter school because a)they already filled their quota for children of minorities  or the poor or b) haven’t filled their quota for children of minorities or the poor so can’t take any more affluent children now even if you CAN donate $1 million to us, so now the Betsy DeVos’s of the world have to send their children to public school whether they like it or not. Or what if our lowest income families that can’t afford healthcare, no longer can get free contraception because of the defunding of planned parenthood, and suddenly we see an increase in birthrates in that demographic? If you’re one of those congressmen or women that have insisted on repeal and replace the ACA, before you continue down this path just stop for a moment and imagine you’re not a congressman/woman but an average hourly wage worker, your spouse can’t work, you live in an apartment and drive a beat up car. Close your eyes and picture it, life is tough, you can’t afford much for new clothes, let alone dining out, and the ACA is the only insurance you can get. Are you still so eager to push thru the plan you propose under those same conditions? What about if you’re a new single mom? Will there be an increase in funding for WIC? For Medicaid? For the stresses imposed on those families? (And to Matt Garza, here’s a newsflash: married couples shouldn’t be forced to practice abstinence just to prevent an unwanted pregnancy.) Don’t misunderstand me, I’m not saying that the ACA doesn’t need fixing, it does. But honestly, ask anyone who has ever worked in a large organization with something like this, is it easier to start over, or incrementally fix, and they’ll probably tell you to incrementally fix it so you don’t make a bigger mess of it.

The issues facing us are people issues. It’s that simple. And until politicians can learn to leave their titles at the door, get off their asses and away from Capitol Hill, really learn how real people live and the real pressures they face, and finally learn to leave the partisan bickering outside the room when they meet, they’ll never figure it out. Or, to paraphrase Donald Ogden Steward and Philip Barry who wrote The Philadelphia Story, “You’ll never be a first class politician until you’ve learned to have some regard for human frailty.”